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Common Core Social Studies and TCI

TCI and Common Core Go Together Like PB&J

To meet Common Core's goal of developing college and career ready students, you need a curriculum that moves beyond basic recall and memorization. With TCI's rich resources, students read, write, speak, and listen as they master the discipline of social studies in a meaningful way.

See how TCI addresses these key areas of the Common Core:

Elementary

Key Points from the ELA Common Core

TCI Materials

Images

Reading

  • Informational and literary texts are balanced with at least 50% of reading time devoted to expository texts.
  • Establishes a "staircase" of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read as they move throughout the grades.
  • Emphasizes the close reading of text to determine main ideas, supporting details, and evidence.

Students analyze images and then read complex text about the Early English Settlements of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth. Students complete reading notes in their Interactive Student Notebook to record key details. A word bank is provided for each settlement to ensure they are using key vocabulary and citing important details and evidence from the text.

The main text is accompanied by a Reading Further feature that provides detailed information on a special topic. In this Reading Further, students read about King Philip, the leader of the Wampanoag people, and his decision to go to war against the English settlers. Students complete a cause and effect chart to identify events that lead to the war and the war’s impact.

Writing

  • Three types of writing are emphasized from the earliest grades—writing to persuade, writing to inform/explain, and writing to convey experience.
  • Effective use of evidence is central throughout the writing standards.
  • Routine production of writing appropriate for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences is emphasized.

Students complete three different writing tasks—each with a different purpose, audience and length. Students begin this lesson by writing a narrative on the challenges they would face if they attended school in another country. This quick write is designed to get students thinking about the challenges confronted by the early English settlers in the Americas.

After learning detailed information about the English settlements, students complete a persuasive writing assignment that asks them to create an advertisement that encourages people to move to Jamestown or Plymouth. Students are asked to include specific details about the settlement to ensure that they include facts and evidence from the text. Finally, in the lesson assessment students write a friendly letter describing the conditions at Jamestown.

Speaking and Listening

  • Participation in rich, structured academic conversations in one-on-one, small-group, and whole class situations is emphasized in the standards.
  • Contributing accurate, relevant information; responding to and building on what others have said; and making comparisons and contrasts are important skills for productive conversations.

Opportunities for speaking and listening are embedded throughout this lesson in a variety of ways. Students participate in a whole class discussion to analyze historic images of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth. After reading the text that corresponds to each image, students participate in a small-group discussion centered on a series of structured questions. And, finally, select students take on the role of one of the historical figures in the image and present key information to the class from the perspective of that person.

Language

  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of English when writing and speaking.
  • Acquire and use general academic and domain-specific words.
  • Focus on developing skills to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown works or phrases.

Key vocabulary terms are introduced at the beginning of the lesson and students complete a vocabulary development assignment, such as the Word Parts Log. This log trains students to break down words to infer meaning.

An Editing and Proofreading Checklist is included to help students create writing that is free of errors.

Middle School

Key Points from the ELA Common Core

TCI Materials

Images

Reading

  • Emphasizes citing specific textual evidence that supports analysis and requires students to draw inferences and determine central ideas or themes.
  • Establishes a scaffolding effect of increasingly complex reading material.
  • Integrate and evaluate diverse content and analyze how specific portions of text relate to each other and the whole.

Students work to complete a timeline challenge using critical thinking to review the main events and ideas of launching a new republic.

Students will then read aloud and discuss their timeline entries identifying key information they found in the text and identifying areas for further research.

Next, students use their reading notes to complete a visual discovery activity designed to help them identify the Essential Question: How well did President Andrew Jackson promote democracy?

Writing

  • Three types of writing are emphasized–writing to persuade, writing to inform/explain, and writing to convey experience.
  • Routine production of writing appropriate for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences is emphasized.
  • Effective use of evidence is central throughout the writing standards.
  • Development, organization, and style of writing are strengthened through planning, revising, editing, rewriting.

Students read detailed information about Jackson's policy of forced removal of American Indians, then complete a "letter to the editor" using persuasive writing to protest the removal of The Cherokees. Students are asked to use specific evidence from the text regarding the physical and emotional hardships the Cherokee people faced during this time.

Students create written dialogue to reflect the feelings of the common people and upper class regarding Jackson's journey from the frontier to the White House.

Finally, students create a commemorative plaque and a "wanted" poster to evaluate how well Andrew Jackson promoted democracy. This writing exercise assists students with analyzing and identifying the positive and negative contributions of Jackson to American democracy.

Speaking and Listening

  • Participation in a range of conversations and collaborations including one-on-one, small-group, and whole class discussions and presentations.
  • Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

Students are introduced to the lesson by listening to a folk song written for Jackson's campaign, and answering a series of structured response questions.

Students then participate in a whole class discussion to analyze and bring to life images of key events in the presidency of Andrew Jackson.

Finally, students work in groups to take on the role of farmers and bankers and present key information to the class from the perspective of their characters.

Language

  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of English when writing and speaking.
  • Demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge and determining the meaning of unknown words and phrases.

Key vocabulary terms are introduced at the beginning of the lesson. Students incorporate key terms in Reading Note responses.

Students clarify the meaning of unfamiliar terms, and develop understanding of their context during a vocabulary development exercise.


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